Black content creators voice their concerns through Black Lives Matter 

In 2020, brands suddenly became aware about the unfair treatment meted out to Black content creators. They became more conscious about the efforts Black b2b tech influencers make in promoting brands. But the credit to this change goes to the social activism of 2020 and growth of influencer marketing platform.

In 2019, a report projected growth of influencer marketing search to be $15 billion by 2022. And it is a huge growth that brands simply can’t miss to take advantage of this growth. Also, brands were ready to make their influencer outreach more inclusive, a demand that Black content creators were making for a long time.

In 2020, Black content creators became more active on social media about their plight and they got the support of Gen Z. It is a generation of consumers that are ethnically and racially diverse but were more drawn to the brands that were inclusive. Their preference tilted the Influencer marketing stat towards inclusive brands.

The movement started in 2020 was called Black Lives Matter (BLM) and it started heated debates over disparity of Black employees at every business. Since brands want to tap the buying capacity of the Gen Z, they started responding to Influencer marketing reporting about Black content creators.

Brands noticed that by not making their influencer list more inclusive, they won’t reach a wider audience that could be potential buyers of their products and advocate their products with word of mouth. Soon the things started to change for Black content writers.

Sashagai Ruddock is a Black content creator that uses humor and vulnerability to empower the community she belongs to. She said that she noticed some change as the brand started to speak out, but she feared that people would forget about that eventually move on.

Dorrington Reid is another Black content creator that has built a community of 30K plant lovers on Instagram. He said that he started receiving increased offers for partnership with big brands after the BLM movement transformed influencer marketing marketplace.

Ciara Johnson had a very bad experience as Black content creator before BLM but after the successful activism of 2020, she noticed the role media can play in influencing decisions. She advised Black content creators should join hands with others to make a strong community.

Danielle Salmon is a passionate blogger. She loves food and photography as well. For her, content creation as a Black influencer was a roller coaster ride but she noticed more influencer marketing companies reaching out to her post BLM.